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Homeowners Association Board Best Practices

Posted by IKO Community Management on August 29, 2013 at 4:26 PM

Welcome to the Board!

To be effective, a homeowners association needs a strong board of directors that understands its role and pursues it with passion and a concise mission in mind. At IKO Community Management we know first hand that a strong board of directors who follows the following tips is a successful one.

As a board member, acting through the board as a whole, these are the homeowners association board best practices:

  • Enforce the documents
  • Establish sound fiscal policies and maintain accurate records
  • Develop a workable budget, keeping in mind the needs, requirements and expectations of the community
  • Establish reserve funds
  • Act on budget items and determine assessment rates
  • Collect assessments
  • Establish, publicize, and enforce rules and penalties
  • Authorize legal action against owners who do not comply with the rules
  • Review local laws before passing rules or sending bylaws to membership for approval
  • Appoint committees and delegate authority to them
  • Select an attorney, an auditor, insurance agent and other professionals for the association
  • Provide adequate insurance coverage, as required by the bylaws and local governmental agencies
  • Inform board members of all business items that require their vote
  • Inform members of important board decisions and transactions
  • See that the association is protected for the acts of all parties with fiscal responsibilities
  • Attend and participate at meetings

Operating a homeowner association carries with it many of the very same duties and responsibilities as overseeing any other business. Serving as a board member is a valuable and rewarding experience that should be undertaken by those who see it as an opportunity to serve their fellow neighbors while protecting and enhancing the assets of the community. It is serious business, but also a task worth doing well in order to safeguard the investments of all.

Download IKO's Guide to Running a Community Association

Topics: HOA Board