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Should You Hire A Landscaping Company To Help Your Community?

Posted by IKO Community Management on July 20, 2017 at 9:00 AM

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No one wants to be surrounded by boring or unappealing green areas, especially not homeowners. According to REALTOR® Magazine, quality landscaping can increase the value of your home by 12 percent.

One of the perks of living in a HOA community is knowing that you’ll never have to worry about your neighborhood's appearance because your board has it covered.

However, if you're on the board, ensuring the quality of the entire community’s landscaping can be a difficult task. Your community might face changing weather conditions, unruly HOA board members and homeowners who struggle to maintain their own yard, or lack of time. 

For you to tackle this seasonal undertaking, hire an association management company to contract a local company. The selected company takes the role of the "community landscaper" and becomes responsible for your community’s green spaces.

Benefits Of Hiring A Contracted Community Landscaper

  • Professional Experience. Landscaping is a lot harder than you think. Some flowers only grow during spring or fall, while some trees don’t bloom annually and can leave only branches. Certain species need special climates, and on top of that, grass needs to be properly hydrated and treated to maintain its health. Trees need to be properly inspected to ensure that they're healthy and not obstructing roads or sidewalks.

    It’s almost impossible for one person to know all of this -- unless you hire a professional landscaper. It's OK that not everyone has a green thumb, but having someone who does is super helpful. Not only are they knowledgeable in the field, but they also have experience with maintaining all forms of greenery.
  • Cost Efficiency. It might seem like hiring a company to do the landscape is more costly than doing it on your own because of contracts and service fees, but that's simply not the case. To manage your neighborhood's landscape, you have to purchase all of the necessary supplies on your own (which doesn't bode well for the HOA budget). This can include seeds, plants, trees, mulch, gravel and rocks, gardening equipment, and so much more.

    According to ImproveNet, the average cost of landscaping in Frederick, Maryland, is $4,255 for a single lot. Imagine if you chose to DIY your entire neighborhood...
  • Consistency. With the professional experience provided by a good landscaping company, you can rest easy knowing that they’ll show up on a consistent schedule. By hiring some help, you don’t have to worry about setting aside time during your already busy week to dedicate toward greenery maintenance.

    You also won’t have to be concerned with the quality of the landscape. You can rely on the contracted company to routinely preserve your neighborhood's outdoor quality, which keeps the homes' resale value high.
  • Ease. What’s better than knowing that you live in an attractive community without doing any of the manual labor? Arguably, the best benefit of hiring a company to do your community’s green maintenance is the ease of it all. It means less responsibility for you and other HOA board members, so you can rest easy in your beautiful community. 

If your HOA board is nervous about hiring a local company to landscape, consider hiring an association management company to do it for you. Our community managers will even perform basic check-ups on green spaces.

If you don't have an association management company, your board can organize a
checklist that gives your community an idea about how to improve green areas:

Click Here For Your Landscaping Checklist

If you're still unsure on what to do for your community’s needs, contact IKO Community Management. We offer association management services for these tedious tasks, so you can sit back and bask in its beauty.

Topics: HOA Board